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Full text of "Further Sources Of Vijayanagara History"

158
the whole conduct.    It is not possible (for any one) to observe
all (actions and estimate a person's character).                 (31)
Do iiot kill a person who takes advantage of your
difficulties to do yo:i evil, ween you win victory; but wrest
(from him) his wealth. What harm can a serpent do, when
the sharpness of its fangs is destroyed ? Your enemy will be
loyal to you for the kindness which you show him.            (32)
The extent of the kingdom is the means for the acquisi-
tion of wealth. (Therefore), even if the land is limited (in
extent), excavate tanks and canals and increase the prosperity
of the poor (cnltivator) by leasing him the land for low ari
and koru, so that you may obtain wealth as well as (religious)
merit.                                                                              (38)
The king, having an officer who acts like the jackal on
the battle-field, does not persuade the impoverished cultivators
migrating (from his district) to return, and wants to sell their
cattle and grain and utilise the timber of their houses as fuel,
that king cannot enrich himself, though he may conquer the
seven islands (ie. the whole world).                                   (34)
A king should reserve one-fourth of his income for
charity and personal expenses, half for the maintenance of a
powerful army ; and store (the remaining) fourth in (his) well-
filled treasury. He should watch, by means of his spies, not
only his enemies but the other six members of the state includ-
ing the ministers. He should destroy the bandits in his own
kingdom.                                                                         (35)
A ki&g should punish a thief, discovering him with the aid
of a weft-cherished band of policemen. If, on the contrary, he
inflicts punishment on an innocent person whom the police
substitute foj a runaway thief, does he not acquire disrepute
like the king who had the corpulent merchant impaled ? (36)
A king proficient ia political science - should learn
three-fourth* (of what he has to know) by M own efforte J